Nevada

Overview

Nevada Redistricting Process

Congressional and Legislative

Congressional and legislative maps are enacted by the State Legislature. The Governor can veto the plans.

The Legislature can override a veto with a two-thirds vote. No party currently has a veto-proof majority in either chamber.

Source: Nev. Const. art. IV, § 5.


Previous Redistricting Cycles

2010

  • Congressional
    • Original PlanSB 497
      • Passed = May 10, 2011 (D-controlled)
      • Vetoed = May 14, 2011 (R-controlled)
    • Second PlanAB 566
      • Passed = May 25, 2011 (D-controlled)
      • Vetoed = May 31, 2011 (R-controlled)
    • Special Masters’ Plan
      • Passed = October 14, 2011
      • Slightly Modified by State Court on October 27, 2011
    • Litigation History
      • Guy v. Miller, No. 11-OC-42-1B (Nev. Dist. Ct. Oct. 27, 2011): After the Republican Governor vetoed both of the Legislature’s passed plans, the state court was petitioned to appoint three special masters to draw and adopt constitutional plans. The Special Masters’ passed their plan on October 14, 2011, and on October 27, 2011, the trial court approved the Special Masters’ congressional and legislative plans with slight modifications by the court.
  • Legislative
    • Original PlansSB 497
      • Passed = May 10, 2011 (D-controlled)
      • Vetoed = May 14, 2011 (R-controlled)
    • Second PlansAB 566
      • Passed = May 25, 2011 (D-controlled)
      • Vetoed = May 31, 2011 (R-controlled)
    • Special Masters’ Plans
      • Passed = October 14, 2011
      • Slightly Modified by State Court on October 27, 2011
    • Litigation History
      • Guy v. Miller, No. 11-OC-42-1B (Nev. Dist. Ct. Oct. 27, 2011): After the Republican Governor vetoed both of the Legislature’s passed plans, the state court was petitioned to appoint three special masters to draw and adopt constitutional plans. The Special Masters’ passed their plan on October 14, 2011, and on October 27, 2011, the trial court approved the Special Masters’ congressional and legislative plans with slight modifications by the court.

2000

  • Congressional
    • Original PlanSB 14
      • Passed = June 14, 2001 (Split-control)
      • Signed = June 15, 2001
    • Litigation History
      • None
  • Legislative
    • Original PlanSB 14
      • Passed = June 14, 2001 (Split-control)
      • Signed = June 15, 2001
    • Litigation History
      • None

Ballot Measure Process

Kinds of Ballot Measures
Indirect initiatives and all referendums are permitted to amend statutes. Direct initiatives are permitted to amend the state constitution. Legislatively initiated ballot measures may amend both statutes and the constitution.

Single-Subject Rule
There is a single-subject rule.

Initiative Subject Restrictions
An initiative can only include appropriations or expenditures if it incorporates a legal tax to pay for it.

Signature Requirements
The signature requirement for constitutional amendments, statutory initiatives, and veto referendums is 10% of the voters who voted in the entire state at the last preceding general election. 975,980 people voted in the 2018 General Election in Nevada, so 97,598 signatures are required for constitutional amendments and for veto referendums. Because statutory initiatives must be submitted two years prior to the election in which they are meant to be on the ballot, signature requirements for statutory initiatives on the 2020 ballot will be based on the total number of votes cast in the 2016 General Election in Nevada. In that election, 1,125,429 people voted, so 112,543 signatures were required. For all ballot measures, the 10% of signatures required must be equally apportioned among the state's petition districts, so 24,400 signatures must be gathered from each congressional district.

Submission Deadlines
Before circulating, initiative petitions for constitutional amendments must be submitted to the Secretary of State no earlier than September 1 of the year before the year in which the election is to be held (September 1, 2021). The signed initiative petition must be filed with the appropriate county officials for certification no later than 15 days following the primary election (June 29, 2022). The final filing must be made 90 days prior to the election in which the petition is to appear on the ballot (August 10, 2022). Initiative petitions for statutory amendments must be submitted to county officials no later than 15 days following the general election (November 23, 2022), and the final filing must be made 30 days prior to the convening of the next regular session of the legislature (January 7, 2023, moved to January 6, 2022 due to non-business day). Initial referendum petition filings must be made to the Secretary of State not earlier than August 1 of the year before the year in which the election will be held (August 1, 2021), and signed petitions must be filed with the appropriate county officials no later than 15 days after the primary election (June 29, 2022).

Circulation Period
There is no stated circulation period for initiative petitions.

Ballot Title and Summary
The summary is written by the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Attorney General. Expedited reviews for titles and summaries are not permitted.

Other Requirements
A fiscal impact statement is required. Circulators must be at least 18 years of age. Voter-initiated amendments must be approved at two consecutive elections. Legislatively-referred amendments must be approved twice consecutively by the Legislature and once by the voters. Statutory initiatives cannot be amended or repealed in the three years following its passing. Amendments can be themselves amended or repealed only by receiving majority votes in consecutive regular sessions and by receiving majority approval at a general election. Statutes or resolutions affirmed by the people cannot be amended or repealed except by another vote of the people. Initiatives are permitted on general election ballots, but not on primary or special election ballots or odd-year ballots.

Source: Nev. Const. art. XIX. Nev. Rev. Stat. §§ 293, 295. Nevada Secretary of State Website


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