Tennessee

Overview

Tennessee Redistricting Process

Congressional and Legislative

Congressional and legislative maps are enacted by the State General Assembly. The Governor can veto the plans.

The General Assembly can override a veto with a majority vote of all elected members. Republicans currently have veto-proof majorities in both chambers.

Source: Tenn. Const. art. II, §§ 3-6.


Previous Redistricting Cycles

2010

  • Congressional
    • Original PlanHB 1558
      • Passed = January 13, 2012 (R-controlled)
      • Signed = January 26, 2012
    • Litigation History
      • None
  • Legislative
    • Original PlansHB 1555 (House); SB 1514 (Senate)
      • Passed = January 13, 2012 (House); January 19, 2012 (Senate) (R-controlled)
      • Signed = January 26, 2012 (House); February 9, 2012 (Senate)
    • Litigation History
      • Moore v. State, 436 S.W.3d 775 (Tenn. Ct. App. 2014): Eight registered voters filed a lawsuit challenging the General Assembly’s enacted state Senate plan on the grounds it divided more counties than necessary in violation of the state constitution. On May 15, 2014, the Tennessee Court of Appeals affirmed the trial court’s judgment upholding the plan as constitutional.

2000

  • Congressional
    • Original PlanHB 274
      • Passed = January 10, 2002 (D-controlled)
      • Signed = January 17, 2002
    • Litigation History
      • None
  • Legislative
    • Original PlansHB 276 (House); SB 197 (Senate)
      • Passed = January 10, 2002 (D-controlled)
      • Signed = January 17, 2002
    • Litigation History
      • None

Ballot Measure Process

Kinds of Ballot Measures
Only the Tennessee General Assembly may refer amendments to the ballot. There is no initiative or referendum process.

Source: Tenn. Const. art. XI, §3.


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